Travelling with Time

Containing Trivia relating to Automotive World from Brass Era to Present.

Travelling with Time

Postby jskandhari » Tue Nov 29, 2011 12:42 pm

The Following is a Journey of Cars in TimeLine Fashion....


Steam Era
Thomas Savery patented the first crude steam engine in 1698.
Thomas Newcomen improved on this design in 1712 known as Atmospheric Engine
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– Steam is shown pink and water is blue.
– Valves move from open (green) to closed (red)


Scotsman James Watt improved on the steam engine 1775 with this it became a truly viable piece of machinery that helped start the Industrial Revolution.
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Also points to be noted are
>James Watt came up with the term HORSEPOWER as a way to explain how much work his steam engines could do for a Potential Buyer.
>This is the Same James Watt after whom the Unit of Power is named - The WATT

1769

1769 - Cugnot's "Fardier à vapeur" aka Steam Dray
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For More from where the above pics came Read Driven: Cugnot 1770 steamer
Cugnot was one of the first to employ successfully a device for converting the reciprocating motion of a steam piston into rotary motion by means of a ratchet arrangement. The following year, a full-size version of the fardier à vapeur was built, specified to be able to carry 4 tons and cover 2 lieues (7.8 km or 4.8 miles) in one hour, a performance it never achieved in practice. The vehicle, which weighed about 2.5 tonnes tare, had two wheels at the rear and one in the front where the horses would normally have been; this front wheel supported the steam boiler and driving mechanism. ( NOTICE: First Front Wheel Drive ) Speed: upto 4 km/h (2.5 mph)


An engraving from the 19th century famously shows Cugnot’s fardier à vapeur crashing into a wall, apparently out of control as men leap away in terror. Cugnot became known not as the creator of the first self-propelled vehicle but as the man responsible for the first ever road accident involving a self-propelled vehicle. His fardier, in ignorant hindsight, was deemed dangerously unstable, vibration-prone, insufficently braked and inefficiently designed. That view has held sway ever since.


1801

Dec 24 1801 -The Puffing Devil - Developed by Richard Trevithick
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Puffing Devil by Andy Darby

Richard Trevithick was a British Inventor who took Seven of his Friends for a Test Drive ( Yup in Test Drives started from the First Steam- Powered Passenger Locomotive ) on his "Puffing Devil" (as it was showcased on the eve of Christmas ) also known as "Puffer" ( for obvious Reasons ) Unlike the steam engine pioneered by the Scotsman James Watt, Trevithick's used "strong steam"--that is, steam at a very high pressure 145 pounds per square inch, or psi, compared to the Watt engine's 5 psi, which enabled him to build an engine small enough to fit in his "Puffer" car. Trevithick's engines were more dangerous than Watt's, but they were also extremely versatile. Speed : 14.5 km/h (9 mph)

They were utilised in various sections of Society Like
>Mines
>Farms
>Factories
>Ships
>Ofcourse as Passenger Locomotive





Trevithick Day usually celebrated on the Last Saturday of April to commemorate Richard Trevithick providing the recognition he deserves and Camborne celebrates its importance as a major player in Cornwall's former mining industry.




1803 - London Steam Carriage Developed by Richard Trevithick
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London Steam Carriage was driven about 10 miles through the streets of London to Paddington and back via Islington, with seven or eight passengers, at a speed of 4–9 mph, the streets having been closed to other traffic.
The engine had a single horizontal cylinder which, along with the boiler and firebox, was placed behind the rear axle. The motion of the piston was transmitted to a separate crankshaft via the forked piston rod. The crankshaft drove the axle of the driving wheel (which was fitted with a flywheel) via a spur gear. The steam cocks (used to blow out water condensate from the steam chest), the force pump and the firebox bellows were also driven by the crankshaft.


Details
Engine . . . . High pressure, simple expansion steam engine with feed water pump, heater and steam blast. cylindrical boiler mounted overhanging rear axle, made from 6.5 mm thick wrought iron. single cylinder, double acting, mounted horizontally, inside the boiler, made from cast iron. spring operated 4 way valve for steam engine runs in one direction only, (backwards in the patent drawing)
Working pressure . . . . . 2 bar
Cylinder bore . . . . . . . . . 140 mm.
Sroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 762 mm.
Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.7 litres x 2
Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HP . . (2 kW) at 50 r.p.m.
Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Coal
Steering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tiller direct to single front wheel.
Transmission . . . . . . . . . Separate gear drive to each rear wheel,
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Driver can select drive to either or both wheels
Brake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Driver operated lever applying a block to rim of flywheel.
Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 km/h.
Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . about 15 km with 180 ltr water tank.
Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . length 4905 mm
Width . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2184 mm
Height . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3454 mm
Driving wheel diameter . 2438 mm
Weight, empty . . . . . . . . . 1.9 tonnes
Chassis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wrought iron and wood sandwich.
Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To carry up to 8 people
Cost in 1803 . . . . . . . . . For building the coach less the engine £207 for shipping the engine from Falmouth to London £20 14s 11d cost of engine not known.

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Boiler

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For More Check out http://www.steamcar.net/brogden-1.html

1805 - Oruktor Amphibolos
No Concrete evidence exists that it existed apart from the Drawings and papers of Oliver Evans inventor of Oruktor Amphibolos, which if existed was the First Amphibious Vehicle
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Evans claimed the vehicle to be 30-foot (9.1 m) long 15 ton scow, powered by a 5 horse-power steam engine.

1824-1825 - Steam Drag (an engine for pulling a coach on a roadway) constructed by W. H. James powered by two separate small two-cylinder engines.

1825 - 1829 - Steam Vehicle constructed by Goldsworthy Gurney
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The boiler was at the Back connected by Tubes. Gurney Steam Carriage Company's vehicles were built at his Regent's Park Manufactory works, and tested around the park's barrack yard, and on frequent excursions to Hampstead, Highgate, Edgware, Barnet and Stanmore, at speeds of up to 20 miles per hour (32 km/h).
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1829 - W. H. James constructed a car-automobile, that marched at the speed of 2.5 kilometers per hour, transporting passengers, a coach seating 15 and weighing 3 tons with two boilers running at the high-pressure of 250 psi.

1829 - Infant constructed by Walter Hancock; a small ten-seater bus, with which in 1831 he began a regular service between Stratford and London. This vehicle was made famous by its later revenue-earning journeys from London to Brighton, which were a British first, and also demonstrated its usability by successfully ascending a frozen slope of 5 degrees where horse-drawn coaches were struggling. The vehicle was ultimately lost in an accident when the driver blocked the safety valve in order to increase the starting pressure and the boiler exploded.
31st of October, 1832, the "Infant" took an experimental trip to Brighton, which was documented in Mr. Alexander Garden's "Journal of Elemental Locomotion.

22 April 1833 - The 'Enterprise' Steam Carriage ( Bus ) - constructed by Walter Hancock
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The original Enterprise started running in 1833, carrying fare paying passengers in London and making occasional trips farther afield. (This is about the time George Stephenson was building the 'Rocket' and the 'railway age' was beginning) It incorporated many of the best features of the time including several of Hancock's own patents such as the artillery wheel. . His method of suspending the vehicle on leaf springs and in particular of locating the rear axle in such a way that it could be driven from an engine within the carriage were very advanced for the time and wouldn't have seemed out of date 100 years later. His use of a steering wheel was novel for the time also. The body was similar to the Shillabeer Omnibus - a successful design of horse drawn vehicle where up to 14 passengers sat in two rows facing each other. The engine had two large, vertical, double acting cylinders in a simple, cleverly arranged frame and could run at up to about 100 rpm. His boiler can best be described as similar to seven modern domestic pressed-steel radiators bolted together with a coke fire underneath them, supplying steam at up to 100 psi (6.1 bar). This arrangement meant that there is less water in the boiler than a conventional boiler and steam can be generated from cold more quickly and the overall weight of the vehicle is lower. Burning coke and using the draught from a fan driven from the crankshaft meant that the exhaust was relatively clean and unobtrusive, unlike Gurney's machines. He favoured the steam blast and burnt coal, producing a fiery exhaust.
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For more Read 1802 Walter Hancock's Enterprise Built by Tom Brogden
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August 1834
The Autopsy/Automaton - The Era & The Infant II two steam buses constructed by Walter Hancock and deployed on the London - Paddington route transferring nearly 4000 passengers.
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Infant II to Right

When driving in 1833 Walter Hancock's arms became very painful when holding the steering because of the rough roads. He invented a device he used on Infant II, Enterprise, Era and Automaton that would lock the steering with a foot lever, to be used on straight sections of road. Walter Hancock thus can be used to quote that he laid the foundation for Cruise Control. ( Vital Information brought forward by David Eustace, Canada.)

Later were removed from Steam Bus Passenger service due to strong Horse Carriage Lobby --> Turnpike Trusts( Act )
The 1834 Act stated that "For every Carriage moved or propelled or set or kept in Motion by Steam or Machinery or any other Power or Agency than animal Power the toll to be 2/6 per Wheel for each wheel therof".

This meant that it would have cost ten shillings for a steam-powered wagon with four wheels to pass through just one tollgate, compared with just two pence for a horse and cart !
Perhaps the turnpikes could have competed with the railways for a bit longer if they hadn't forced steam-cars off the road by charging so much

J-asneet S-ingh K-andhari
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Travelling with Time

Postby jskandhari » Wed Nov 30, 2011 12:15 pm

After over 30yrs of Isolation from Public Roads in Europe mainly Britain due to Harsh Legislations against the Steamed Road Locomotives.
The Highway Act 1835
Public Health Act 1875
Local Government Act 1888
Local Government Act 1894

Apart form these major Limiting Act(s) were
The Locomotives on Highways Act 1861:
1)Limited the weight of vehicles to 12 tons (12 tonnes).
2)Imposed a speed limit of 10 mph (16 km/h) on open roads in town.

The Locomotive Act 1865 (Red Flag Act):
1)Set speed limits of 4 mph (6 km/h) in the country and 2 mph (3 km/h) in towns.
2)Stipulated that self-propelled vehicles should be accompanied by a crew of three: the driver, a stoker and a man with a red flag walking 60 yards (55 m) ahead of each vehicle. The man with a red flag or lantern enforced a walking pace, and warned horse riders and horse drawn traffic of the approach of a self propelled machine.
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Highways and Locomotives (Amendment) Act 1878
1)Made the red flag optional under local regulation
2)The distance ahead of the still necessary pedestrian crew member was reduced to 20 yards (18 m).
3)Vehicles were required to stop on the sight of a horse.
4)Vehicles were forbidden from emitting smoke or steam to prevent horses being alarmed.

NOTE: Speed Limit Enforcement Started with these acts.

Locomotives on Highways Act 1896
This act greatly helped in making ownership/adoption of Automobiles a practical reality as majority of the Strict Rules were either removed or Relaxed. Implemented on November 14, 1896.
This Act defined a new category of vehicle, light locomotives, which were vehicles under 3 tons unladen weight. These 'light locomotives' were exempt from the 3 crew member rule, and were subject to the higher 14 mph (22 km/h) speed limit although most Local Government Boards had the authority to reduce it to 12 mph (19 km/h).

NOTE: Definition of LMV (Light Motor Vehicle) came into existence.
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Re: Travelling with Time

Postby jskandhari » Wed Nov 30, 2011 4:33 pm

Victorian Era of Steam Motor-Vehicles began.

1858 - Steam Bus Carriage - constructed by Thomas Rickett of Buckingham

Instead of looking like a carriage, it resembled a small locomotive. It consisted of a steam-engine mounted on three wheels: two large driven rear wheels and one smaller front wheel by which the vehicle was steered. The whole was driven by a chain drive and a maximum speed of 12mph was reached.
The weight of the machine was 1.5 tonnes
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1860 - Steam Bus Carriage - constructed by Thomas Rickett of Buckingham

The vehicle was similar except the fact that it was heavier and incorporated a spur-gear drive replacing the Chain Drive, the cylinders were coupled directly outside the cranks of Driving Axel.

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1860 - Three wheel Vehicle - Internal Combustion Engine - constructed by Jean Joseph Lenoir
The first successful internal combustion was designed and built by a Belgian engineer, Jean Joseph Lenoir, and patented in 1860. It operated on coal gas, and was basically a two stroke engine. However the stoke did not compress the gas, so it was not very efficient. Even so, it produced more power for its weight than steam engines of the day, and some 500 engines were produced before it was surpassed in technology by the internal combustion engine of Otto. Lenoir put one of his engines in a three wheeled vehicle, which completed a 50 mile road trip at about 3 km/hr.
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1863 - Steam Carriage - constructed by Sylvester H. Roper
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He drove around Boston, Massachusetts on a steam carriage he invented in 1863.
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FACT: 1 June 1896 S.H Roper died immediately after an accident during Testing his Experimental Vehicle, a Pope Manufacturing Company Columbia bicycle with a steam engine added, on the Charles River bicycle track. Roper was clocked at 2 minutes 1.4 seconds for the flying mile, for a top speed 40 mph (64 km/h). He sustained Head injury when we lost balance and later it was found he died due to Heart Attack. Though it is not clear whether the Heart attack was due to the Incident or Natural.

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1866 - Small Road Steamer - constructed by H.P. Holt
It was able to reach a speed of 20mph on level roads, it had a vertical boiler at the rear and two separate twin cylinder engines, each of which drove one rear wheel by means of a chain and sprocket wheels.
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1868 - Steam Pierre Michaux Velocipede - constructed by Louis-Guillaume Perreaux thus Inventing the First MotorCycle
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in France, a Louis-Guillaume Perreaux commercial steam engine was attached to a Pierre Michaux metal framed velocipede, creating the Michaux-Perreaux steam velocipede.Along with the Roper steam velocipede, it might have been the first motorcycle. The only Michaux-Perreaux steam velocipede made is in the Musée de l'Île-de-France, Sceaux, and was included in the The Art of the Motorcycle exhibition in New York in 1998.

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It was an experiment which lead to the evolution of a new segment in Automobile World. Louis-Guillaume Perreaux and Sylvester H. Roper are known for their invention of new segment which we now know it as Motorcycles.

1868 - Steam Carriage - constructed by J.H. Knight of Farnham

John Henry Knight of Farnham built a four wheeled[b] steam carriage which originally only had a [b]single-cylinder engine.

1869 - Three-wheeled Vehicle - constructed by Catley and Ayres of York
It was a small three wheeled vehicle propelled by a horizontal twin cylinder engine which drove the rear axle by spur-gearing; only one rear wheel was driven, the other turning freely on the axle. A vertical fire-tube boiler was mounted at the rear with a polished copper casing over the fire box and chimney; the boiler was enclosed in a mahogany casing. The front wheel was used for steering and the weight was only 19 cwt.
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1870 - Three Wheeled Steam Carriage [/b] - constructed by L.J. Todd
it consisted of 2 cylinder placed vertically, located infront of the coal bunker on either side. Each of these engines was developed to drive one of the Rear Wheels through cones and belt. The carriage was said to carry two people and a success.
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1870 - The first Marcus Car - constructed by Siegfried Samuel Marcus
He put an internal combustion engine on a simple handcart. This appliance was designed for liquid combustibles and made him the first man propelling a vehicle by means of gasoline.
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1871 - Road Steamer - constructed by R.W. Thomson of Aberdeen

1871, The road-steamer of R.W. Thomson of Aberdeen became famous because of wheels were shod with heavy solid rubber tyres.

NOTICE: Solid Rubber Tyer came into existence

Also to be noted
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R. E. B. Crompton designed a Road Steam Passenger Carriage powered by a Thompson (between 1871-1875). The Two Road Trains were also used for moving troops making them the worlds first powered military troop carriers.

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1872 - Steam Coach - constructed by Charles Randolph of Glasgow

Steam Coach was 15 feet (5 m) in length, weighed four and a half tons, but had a maximum speed of only 6mph. Two vertical twin-cylinder engines where independent of one another and each drove one of the rear wheels by spur-gearing. The entire vehicle was enclosed and fitted with windows all around, carried six people, and even had two driving mirrors for observing traffic approaching from behind, the earliest recorded instance of such a device.

NOTICE: Rear View Mirrors came into Existence.

1875 - Three Wheeled Steam Vehicle - constructed by Neville Grenville of Glastonbury
In 1875, R. Neville Grenville of Glastonbury constructed a 3-wheeled steam vehicle which traveled a maximum of 15 miles per hour. This vehicle is still in existence, preserved in the Bristol City Museum.
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Officially the oldest running self-propelled vehicle in the World. The carriage, was in news 2009 for finding itself a new home at Britain's National Motor Museum at Beaulieu.The original vehicle had a single-cylinder engine mounted on to the steam boiler, it was soon upgraded to a twin-pot design which allowed it to zoom past horse carriages at 32 km/h.





1878 - The Obedient aka L'Obeissante - Constructed by Amédée Bollée
The obedient twin-engine this car was equipped with a unique system of management, including chains and cams designed to make a circle geometrically correct even on shorter rays; each wheel commanded a rear wheel, eliminating the need to use a differential.
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The Obedient, safe and silent, weighed nearly five tons and reached the 40 km/h. Bollée wanted a lighter car: in 1878, succeeded to the obedience of Mancelle, ancestor of all cut off from town. The anatomy of this machine is special in that the location of the bodies is that of a modern machine: vertical motor disposed at the front under a cover, attacking the rear axle by a motor shaft and a longitudinal angle cone with differential built!
In his vehicles the boiler was mounted behind the passenger compartment with the engine at the front of the vehicle. L'Obeissante, moreover, in 1873 had independent suspension on all four corners.

NOTICE: Boiler at Rear - Engine at Front. <- Ring any bells :D

1878-79 - La Mancelle - constructed by Amédée Bollée
The Mancelle had considerable success. It was figured in the Exposition of 1878 and carried out fifty sorties. She touched speed of 42 km/h with an average of 16 people on board. There were even private clients. The industrial Koechlin, who subsequently was associated with Peugeot factories, which commanded a Mancelle built at full speed, it was delivered on May 6, 1879: it circulated for over twenty years.


The car that was several years ahead of the general architecture of the car was Mancelle. despite the presence, in the rear compartment mechanics, 3-cylinder engine is mounted under the front cover, exposed for the first time in mobile exhibition of 1878 in Paris, this car, which aroused great interest , was priced at 12,000 gold francs.
Bollée was soon as enthusiastically supported by the Cordier, the first "car dealer" in the world. The tailpiece is the famous who organized trips to Austria and Germany. Emperor Franz Joseph himself held to try the Mancelle, which took the honors of the Palace of Schonbrunn.

NOTICE - Car Dealerships came into existence.

1880 - New - Station Wagon - constructed by Amédée Bollée
New model for 1880 Bollee, was a small tour bus for 6 people, say a "station wagon" steam. Weighing 3 tonnes with a 15 hp engine, which can be pushed to 45 km/h.This new car had to covered for glorious 15yrs after its release, when it was ranked the places of honor in the Paris-Bordeaux race of 1895.
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With No. 24, New participate in the race in 1895 Paris-Bordeaux-Paris, where she finished in last place, far behind the winner Emile Levassor. The car could claim a much better place, but a cloth "forgotten" in the gears of distribution will result in frequent and regular repairs. Note that Amedee Bollee named New to this car because of a device for regulating steam novel, unrelated systems then in use.


1880 - Mail - constructed by Amédée Bollée
A. Bollée had built a successful FORTY-SEAT bus, the Proposed Mail, which had not the slightest trouble functioning.
During a trip to Berlin, the Mancelle received a triumphant welcome.

1881 - La Rapide - constructed by Amédée Bollée
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La Rapide of 1881, which exceeded 60 km/h, was built in several copies.
A mail-coach-body Muhlbacher, commanded by the Marquis de Broc, of Parigné-le-Polin, at a price of 35,000 gold francs, took the road in 1885. He was seen traveling on roads in the Sarthe in 1900. It is today the Museum of Compiègne.
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1883 - Benz & Company Rheinische Gasmotoren-Fabrik usually referred to as, Benz & Cie is founded by Karl Benz, Max Rose and Friedrich Wilhelm Eßlinger
Quickly growing to twenty-five employees, it soon began to produce static gas engines as well.

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1884 - La Marquise - constructed by De Dion & Bouton
First Car to go on Sale, Catalogs were issued for its sale.


Aired horizontal underfloor-mounted two-cylinder tandem-compound single-acting steam engines with high-pressure cylinders of 75mm bore, expansion cylinders of 115mm bore, and a common stroke of 90mm. Inlet and exhaust via slide valves operated by eccentrics, manual steam admission control located at centre of vehicle. Direct drive to each rear wheel by overhanging cranks.
Front-mounted coke-fired vertical water-tube wrought-iron boiler of patented design, surrounded by the coke box, with a water tank to the rear of the vehicle beneath the dos-\ga-dos seating.
Channel steel chassis with semi-elliptic suspension front and rear, wheelbase 1.12m, front track 1,24m, rear track 0.44m. Front wheels approx 0.8m diameter, rear approx 0.6m diameter; all wheels wire-spoked with bronze hubs and solid rubber tyres. Centrally-operated hand-brake operating shoes on the rear tyres, foot-brake also to rear tyres. Steering to front wheels by spade-handled twist-grip on the right-hand side of the vehicle.
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It is the Oldest Legally Running Vehicle till Date
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More at http://borelcom.co.uk/?p=124
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Some Facts
The de Dion-Bouton company was founded in 1883 by Comte Marquis Albert de Dion, Georges Bouton (1847—1938) and brother-in-law Charles-Armand Trépardoux. The company manufactured steam and gas-powered automobiles, railcars, gun parts, armoured vehicles, aircraft engines, and aftermarket motorcycle or vélocipède engines until 1932. By 1900, de Dion-Bouton was the largest automobile manufacturer in the world, producing 400 cars and 3,200 engines in a single year, and was the first company to mass-produce the V8 engine.

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1884 - British engineer Edward Butler constructed the first petrol (gasoline) internal combustion engine. Butler invented the spark plug, magneto, coil ignition and spray jet carburettor, and was the first to use the word petrol.

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1884 - Kerosine-burning automobile, built by E. S. Callihan
He built a Automobile that ran on Kerosene as fuel in the Woonsocket, Dakota Territory, in 1884.
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1885 - MotorWagen - Invented by Karl Benz
It was the first automobile entirely designed as such to generate its own power, not simply a motorized stage coach or horse carriage, which is why Karl Benz was granted his patent and is regarded as its inventor.
The Motorwagen was patented on January 29, 1886 as DRP-37435: "automobile fueled by gas"( Financial support for PAtent was provided by his Wife Bertha). The 1885 version was difficult to control, leading to a collision with a wall during a public demonstration.
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The Benz Patent-Motorwagen was a three-wheeled automobile with a rear-mounted engine. The vehicle contained many new inventions. It was constructed of steel tubing with woodwork panels. The steel-spoked wheels and solid rubber tires were Benz's own design. Steering was by way of a toothed rack that pivoted the unsprung front wheel. Fully elliptic springs were used at the back along with a live axle and chain drive on both sides. A simple belt system served as a single-speed transmission, varying torque between an open disc and drive disc.

The first Motorwagen used the Benz 954 cc single-cylinder four-stroke engine. This new engine produced ⅔ hp (½ kW) at 250 rpm in the Patent-Motorwagen, although later tests by the University of Mannheim showed it to be capable of .9 hp (0.7 kW) at 400 rpm. It was an extremely light engine for the time, weighing about 100 kg (220 lb). Although its open crankcase and drip oiling system would be alien to a modern mechanic, its use of a pushrod-operated poppet valve for exhaust would be quite familiar. A large horizontal flywheel stabilized the single-cylinder engine's power output. An evaporative carburettor was controlled by a sleeve valve to regulate power and engine speed. The first model of the Motorwagen had not been built with a carburetor, rather a basin of fuel soaked fibers that supplied fuel to the cylinder by evaporation.
The Benz Patent-Motorwagen used ligroin as a fuel.

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1886 - MotorWagen Model 2 - Constructed by Karl Benz
1886. The next year Benz created the Motorwagen Model 2 which had several modifications and overcame the drawbacks of previous version.
Benz later built more models of the Motorwagen, model number 2 boasting 1.5 hp (1.1 kW), and model number 3 with 2 hp (1.5 kW), allowing the vehicle to reach a maximum speed of approximately 10 miles per hour (16 km/h).

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1887 - MotorWagen Model 3 - constructed by Karl Benz
The definitive Model 3 with wooden wheels was introduced, showing at the Paris Expo the same year. The chassis was improved in 1887 with the introduction of wooden-spoke wheels, a fuel tank, and a manual leather shoe brake on the rear wheels.

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1888 - Butler Petrol Cycle - constructed by Edward Butler
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Built by the Merryweather Fire Engine company in Greenwich. The Butler Petrol Cycle (first recorded use of the term) was a three-wheeled vehicle, with the rear wheel directly driven by a 5/8hp (466W) 600 cc (40 in3; 2¼×5-inch {57×127-mm}) flat twin four stroke engine (with magneto ignition replaced by coil and battery), equipped with rotary valves and a float-fed carburettor (five years before Maybach),[2] and Ackermann steering, all of which were state of the art at the time. Starting was by compressed air. The engine was liquid-cooled, with a radiator over the rear driving wheel. Speed was controlled by means of a throttle valve lever. No braking system was fitted; the vehicle was stopped by raising and lowering the rear driving wheel using a foot-operated lever; the weight of the machine was then borne by two small castor wheels. The driver was seated between the front wheels.

The vehicle featured in an article in the 14 February 1891 issue of Scientific American, where it was stated that one gallon of fuel in the form of petroleum or benzolene could propel the vehicle for forty miles (5.9 L/100 km) at a speed of 3-10 mph (5–16 km/h).

Butler improved the specifications of his vehicle over the years, but was prevented from adequately testing it due to the 1865 Red Flag Act, which legislated a maximum speed for self-propelled road vehicles of 2 mph (3 km/h) in built up areas and 4 mph (6.5 km/h) in rural areas. Additionally, the vehicle had to be attended by three people, one of which had to proceed in front of the vehicle waving a red flag.

Butler wrote in the magazine The English Mechanic in 1890,
Butler wrote:"The authorities do not countenance its use on the roads, and I have abandoned in consequence any further development of it."

Due to general lack of interest, Butler broke up his machine for scrap in 1896, and sold the patent rights

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Also to Note in 1888
BERTHA BENZ - Wife of Karl Benz
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In early August, 1888, without her husband's knowledge, Bertha Benz, with her sons Richard(14yrs) and Eugen(15yrs), drove in one of Benz's newly-constructed Patent Motorwagen No. 3 automobiles from Mannheim to Pforzheim, becoming the FIRST PERSON to drive an Automobile over more than a very short distance. The distance was about 104 km (65 mi).

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That trip occurred in early August 1888, as the entrepreneurial lady took her sons Eugen and Richard, fifteen and fourteen years old, on a ride from Mannheim through Heidelberg, and Wiesloch (where she took on ligroin as a fuel at the city pharmacy, making it the first filling station in history), to her maternal hometown of Pforzheim.
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The town pharmacy in Wiesloch, referred to as the "First filling station in the world", with a monument dedicated to her historic first car trip on the right

As well as being the driver, Benz acted as mechanic on the drive, cleaning the carburetor with her hat pin and using a garter to insulate a wire. She refueled at the local pharmacy in Wiesloch and as the brakes wore down, Benz asked a local shoemaker to nail leather on the brake blocks, in doing so, inventing brake lining on the way. These deeds show that Bertha Benz must have had technical know-how and an inventive spirit as well.
It was officially declared a Heritage Memorial in 2008
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Also Worlds First DRIVING LICENSE - August 1, 1888
An official license to operate the Benz Patent Motorwagen on the public roads was issued by Großherzoglich Badisches District Office on August 1, 1888 to * Karl Benz * on his REQUEST
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1888 - Second Marcus Car- constructed by Siegfried Samuel Marcus
This appliance was designed for liquid combustibles propelling a vehicle by means of gasoline. Used a four stroke engines of the Marcus type.
This car was named a Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.
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1892 - Two Seater - constructed by Cederholm brothers
Painter Joens Cederholm and his brother, André, a blacksmith, designed their first car, a two-seater, introducing a condensor in 1894. It was not a success.

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1893
September 21, 1893 - Ladies Phaeton aka Duryea Motor Wagon - Constructed by Charles Duryea and his brother Frank
It was a GASOLINE powered vehicle and is believed to be the First Gasoline Vehicle Constructed in US.
15 Motor Wagons were built and 13 were Sold between 1893 - 1896. First Two were for Made for Personal Purpose 1993 and 194 respectively, but when Frank, won the Chicago Times Herald race in Chicago on a snowy Thanksgiving day 1895. He traveled 54 miles (87 km) at an average 7.5 mph (12 km/h), marking the first U.S. auto race in which any entrants finished.
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Patent Drawing for the Duryea Road Vehicle, 06/11/1895. This is the printed patent drawing of the road vehicle invented by Charles E. Duryea.

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1896 - Whitney Motor Wagon - constructed by George Eli Whitney
Also Founded the Whitney Motor Wagon Company.
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He designed and built a succession of steam-driven carriages. Many of the ideas that found their way into the steam automobile are attributable to him. The Stanley Brothers, famous founders of the Stanley Steamer, sought advice from him and used some of his ideas in their first cars.
Some Additional Information : Whitney Patents


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For more indepth Details and Technical Reading You may refer to the Book Below Published in 1897 at Edinburgh
Motor Cars - Power Carriages for Common Roads
J-asneet S-ingh K-andhari
Ride Safe - Follow Rules - Relish Driving - Have Fun but not at the Cost of Others
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Re: Travelling with Time

Postby jskandhari » Sun Dec 04, 2011 8:13 am

1897 - Steam Steamer - constructed by Twins Francis E. Stanley and Freelan O. Stanley
The Stanley twins went on later to form the Stanley Motor Carriage Company. This was the First Car constructed by Stanley Twins for Personal Use, which gained immense popularity. During 1898-1899, they produced and sold over 200 cars, more than any other U.S. maker. The steam engine boasted 13 moving parts with the count for the entire car at 37. It was light, quiet, and perhaps the most powerful vehicle of its time; definitely the fastest. Once lit, the car automatically generated steam to meet demand with little additional attention required except perhaps watching the water level. All that was required of the driver was to set the throttle to a comfortable speed and to move the tiller for steering.
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In 1899, Freelan and his wife Flora drove one of their cars to the top of Mount Washington in New Hampshire, the third highest peak in the eastern United States. The ascent took more than two hours and was notable as being the first time a car had climbed the 7.6 miles (12.2 km) long Mount Washington Carriage Road; the descent was accomplished by putting the engine in low gear and braking extensively.
The Right of this Early Stanley Steamer was given to Locomobile Company of America in 1899 for US$250000 (with all of one car built, but 199 more ordered), irresistible price in those times.
More at http://www.stanleymotorcarriage.com
NOTICE: Down Hill Driving Technique first elaborative description.

Additional Information
The Twins Applied for numerous Patents
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1899

Locomobile Company of America is Founded by John B. Walker, editor and publisher of the Cosmopolitan Magazine and Amzi L. Barber. Their partnership lasted just a fortnight and Barber continued with Locomobile Company of America. It was located in Watertown, Massachusetts ( for the Time ).
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Locomobile Runabout was the name given to Stanley Steamer after its rights were bought by LCA.
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Locomobile manufactured several thousand of its Runabout model in the period 1899-1903
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Patents Helds by LCA


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The Mobile Company of America was founded by John B. Walker after a fallout with businessman Amzi L. Barber

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1900

Automotive Company named Rambler was Founded by Thomas B. Jeffery.
Rambler1908.jpg
Rambler1908.jpg (15.05 KiB) Viewed 7785 times

The first use of the name Rambler for an American made automobile dates to 1897 when Thomas B. Jeffery of Chicago, Illinois and builder of the Rambler bicycle, constructed his first prototype automobile.
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After receiving positive reviews at the 1899 Chicago International Exhibition & Tournament and the first National Automobile Show in New York City, Jeffery decided to enter the automobile business. In 1900, he bought the old Sterling Bicycle Co. factory in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and set up shop.

Fact: Rambler was only the second mass-produced car in the world (after Olds), turning out 1,500 Models C and D in its first year – roughly 15% of all cars that existed in the USA at the time.

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Locomobile Company of America: Barber moved the company to Bridgeport, Connecticut, the Stanley twins named General Managers.
J-asneet S-ingh K-andhari
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Re: Travelling with Time

Postby Bharat » Thu Dec 08, 2011 4:51 pm

Wow, this is an awesome thread, just stumbled upon it, great job done bro, seriously.
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